eBay Auctions Versus Overstock.com Auctions

Which online auction site can you find the best deals on whatever you are looking for?

This article I going to look at the differences between the two giant of online auctions eBay and overstock auctions. They are rivals in the online auction business but what are the major differences?

eBay was founded in 1995 and most people don’t know it was a large personal site and the owner Pierre Omidyar had a tongue in cheek tribute to the Ebola virus on it. The first official name of eBay was Auction Web, and it was changed to eBay in 1997. This September eBay will be 10 years old!

Overstock auctions known as ‘The big O” was founded in 1997 as D2: Direct discounts which sold surplus as well as returned merchandise via their web site, and in 1997 they changed their name to overstock.com in 1999. They began their auction site in September of 2004, so their auction site will be 3 years old in September.

While both are online auction sites, eBay has cornered the market with millions of visitors a day, both sellers and buyers doing huge business. eBay is a household name while overstock.com is trying to get there. Since you get an offline auction with Overstock.com as well, that way you get to listen to the sales pitch that plays a vital role in determining what you buy and how much you bid in these auctions. Moreover, these appealing sales pitches are also responsible for starting bidding wars at these auction sites.

I have sold on both, and the bigger profits come from eBay in my case anyway. That is because eBay has more visitors per day then overstock.com does.

eBay allows you to bid higher and set a max price you are willing to pay while overstock.com’s bidding structure follows another route. Bidding is slower at overstock.com while the bidding wars on eBay are fun to watch.

I tried out overstock.com on the recommendation of a friend, she mentioned that overstock’s auction site was created to rival eBay, and in response to their ever-rising fees. I found their site to be less profitable and that is why I didn’t stick too long. I have the dubious pleasure of selling the first psychic reading on overstock.

On eBay where I have sold various items for almost 5 years, I have made some money but not anything serious. It’s more like a hobby to me and I never made even close to what I could call a profit. The seller’s fees are high for what I sell, so my profit margin is slim. eBay is surely a buyer’s market while overstock is a seller’s market.

Profits eBay turns a huge profit while overstock.com doesn’t. Both have been in the news in the past few years and not all of what is reported is favorable.

eBay and Overstock both profit from when a seller sells anything though insertion, closing and listing upgrades. If you use Paypal to collect any money from either online auction giant, eBay profits simply because eBay owns paypal.com.

I think for the most part the common everyday people like my self just want lower selling fees and high profits and we are not going to get them at either place.

Listing fees compared. Let’s say I was going to sell a book for 4.95 on either side.

On eBay, I’d pay a listing price of .40 cents, and if the auction is successful I’d pay a closing fee of .0525 (26 cents) on that 4.95 and then there are the PayPal fees. Or auction it off at overstock.com for .20 and pay closing fees of .03 percent (.15 cents) plus PayPal fees if you don’t deal with personal checks or money orders. Overstock is cheaper to run auctions but they don’t have the traffic flow that eBay does.

Searchability EBay’s’ search features are better in some areas, but because of human errors (typos) and the sheer volume of auctions at any given time, it’s harder to find exactly what you’re looking for out there. Granted eBay has more categories then Overstock.com does, it’s easier to find items on Overstock.com. eBay has the corner covered as far as searching out a seller’s reputation, which is very important when you are deciding to buy anything out here.

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